5 Tips to Seating Your Wedding Guests

Categories Wedding Planning + Wedding Stationery

Happy Friday to you! Today we’re dishing about seating for the wedding reception with tips on how to help you and your guests feel right at home! That said, how do you feel about assigned seating?

More common with formal sit-down or buffet meals, assigned tables and/or seating is a great option for most weddings. Here’s why: to avoid the awkward milling about of your guests. Everyone wants to know that they belong–and nothing says “welcome” like a Place Card with their name on it.

wedding place cards and table number cards

5 Seating Tips
for putting guests in their places:

1. Get help! Rally a small, tight-knit group of family and friends to help you round out the relationships for seating your guests. Together, you’ll be able to piece together a comfortable-for-all seating chart.

2. Get to know your venue.
You need to know: spacing, table sizes, proximity to bathrooms, where the band/dj sets up, etc. Put yourself in your grandmother’s chair–does she have a good view of you? Will she be able to hear you? Also, consider creating a special seating area where guests can get away and mingle for quieter conversations?

3. Mix and match your guests. Variety is the spice of life. Lively conversation will naturally occur if you blend the occupations and interests of your guests. That said, also use your common sense to not join guests that you know don’t like each other or wouldn’t be a good fit: divorced parents, friends and family not on pleasant terms. And one of the golden seating rules–don’t put all your single guests at one table. Eek.

4. Give older kids their own table. If they’re old enough and you give them something fun and constructive to do {color, interactive favors, games, etc.} they will not only give their parents a break, but will stay out of mischief and have a blast at your wedding too.

5. Take care of older guests and guests with special needs. Make sure these guests aren’t in harms way or inconvenienced by the location of their table. How far are they from the bathroom? Who’s seated in the aisle? Are your hard of hearing guests seated too close to the band or the speakers? Plus, seating arrangements makes it much easier to get the right meal to the right person.

What seating issues have you or are you facing?

Featured Place Card design: Living Dream {entire design family}

Source Colin Cowie Weddings

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The Best Wedding Kiss …

Categories Romance

THE Kiss! The Wedding Kiss!

Everybody seals the deal with one. Some kisses are smooth. Some kisses … well … are awkward. Out of curiosity, what’s your vote for the best move for the wedding day kiss?

What do you think?

  • Keep it family friendly–like Bogie and Lauren Bacall?
  • Go in for the romantic plant–like Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward?


Getty images via InStyle Weddings

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Wedding Invitation Wording Ideas

Categories Resources

As you know, wording the wedding invitation no longer follows a linear path–it curves along life’s unique circumstances and family dynamics. And as you’re trying to get the etiquette part right, you’re also trying to infuse your wording with style and personality. Simply put, wording your wedding invitation takes time and consideration.

Be inspired by wording options below:

 

invitation wording ideas

 

Many couples are sharing the cost of the wedding with their parents.

When both sets of parents AND the bride and groom are hosting the wedding:

Along with their parents
Anna Evelyn Johnson
and
John Michael Smith
invite you to celebrate their wedding
on Saturday, the twenty-third of July
two thousand thirteen
at six o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Rochester, New York

 

Here are two examples for when the hosts are divorced and not remarried or divorced and remarried.

When the bride’s parents are divorced and {not remarried}:

Patricia Johnson
and
Robert Johnson
request the pleasure of your company
at the wedding celebration of their daughter
Anna Evelyn
to
John Michael Smith
Friday, twenty-third of July
two thousand thirteen
at six o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Rochester, New York

 

When the bride’s parents are divorced and mom {and stepfather} are hosting:

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Korman
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage
of Mrs. Korman’s daughter
Anna Johnson
to
John Smith
on Saturday, the seventh of July
two thousand thirteen
at four o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Brighton, New York

 

 

When both sets of parents are divorced and hosting:
The bride’s mother and groom’s parents are divorced {mom is remarried}.

Colleen Johnson
and
Mr. George Smith and Mrs. Janelle Smith Baker
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Anna Evelyn
to
John Michael
on Saturday, the seventh of July
two thousand thirteen
at six o’clock
Christ Lutheran
Brighton, New York

 

When the bride’s parents are hosting but you want to {include the groom’s family}: 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Korman
and
Mr. and Mrs. George Smith
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Anna Korman
to
John Smith
on Saturday, the seventh of July
two thousand thirteen
at four o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Brighton, New York

 

Many couples want to honor a deceased parent on their wedding invitation. Take care that the wording is such that it doesn’t look like the deceased person is hosting.
When you want to include a {deceased parent} parent on the invitation:

Mr. John Holmes
husband of the late Margaret Holmes
requests the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Anna Evelyn
to
John Michael Smith
Friday, the seventeenth of July
two thousand and thirteen
at six o’clock
Northbrook Church
Jackson, South Dakota

 

When the {bride’s father is deceased} and the groom’s parents are included on the invitation:

Anna Evelyn Johnson
daughter of
Colleen Johnson and the late Robert Johnson
and
John Michael Smith
son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Smith
request the pleasure of your company
at their marriage
Friday, the seventeenth of July
two thousand and thirteen
at six o’clock
Northbrook Church
Jackson, South Dakota

 

 

Do you have a special wording question?

Free Wedding Resources: View all our wedding invitation wording ideas at MagnetStreet Weddings.

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Using Professional Titles: Invites & Envelopes

Categories Wedding Planning

wedding invitation etiquette

One of our most common etiquette questions is how to address wedding invitations to a doctor. We’re going to open that up to all those with professional titles—be they doctors, professors, judges, mayors, military persons, etc.

Guests truly are paying attention to the details and really love it when an invitation arrives pristine, properly addressed—and without misspells. Traditional etiquette suggests that you not use abbreviations for professional and military titles, as well as for street names and states. However, exceptions to this rule include:

  • Mr.
  • Mrs.
  • Ms.
  • Jr.
  • Sr.
  • II
  • III
  • the number one

Addressing wedding envelopes for those with professional titles:

He has the title, she does not
Doctor and Mrs. John Simpson

She has a title, he does not
Doctor Mary Simpson and John Simpson

Married: They both have titles
Doctors Michael and Jane Bertrand
Doctor Jane Bertrand and Professor Michael Bertrand

{ladies first please}

Examples of other titles & scenarios:
Father and Mrs. Daniel Brown
The Reverend and Mrs. Marjorie Jones
Major and Mrs. Ralph Knutson
The Honorable and Mrs. John Smith
{applies to mayors, judges, governors}

Doctor Lydia Langston and Captain Paul Langston United States Army

Tip

If the bride and groom are issuing the invitation, then the bride uses her title—otherwise she does not use her title.

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