Giveaway: Wedding Thank You Cards

Categories Resources + Wedding Stationery

How would you like to WIN 200 Wedding Thank You Cards? I know, silly question. Here’s the skinny … MagnetStreet is giving away 200 Wedding Thank You Cards from our Facebook page. The 5 lucky winners will be randomly drawn and announced on 10/16/12. Enter to win on Facebook.

What’s so great about winning 200 Thank You Cards from MagnetStreet?

1. They’re free! Any design. Any style.
2. Gorgeous, professionally-printed Thank You Cards.
3. Easily personalized by you: your photos, your words, your fonts.
4. Check ‘ordering thank you’s’ off your to-do list early!

Wedding Thank You Photo Card

{One of our most popular designs: Enchanted Encounter Thank You Card}

 

Thank You Card Wording

There will be a lot of Thank Yous to write before and after the wedding. The best plan of attack to write them as soon as possible after the gifts come in and of course, after the wedding. No gift giver would expect a thank you reply the next day–but a good rule of thumb is–sooner than later. 

What to Say

From family to acquaintances, the tone  will vary from note to note. However, the anatomy of each note will be the same.  If the gift came damaged, first try to take care of the problem with the store yourself. And even if you don’t like the gift–you can still be appreciative yet honest. Emphasize something else i.e. “It was so wonderful that you could be with us on our special day!”

5-Part Anatomy of a Thank You Card
1. Salutation
2. Thank you line {keeping it simple and real}
3. Plans for the gift
4. Special acknowledgements {travel, time}
5. Appropriate Closure {Kindly, Best, With Love,}

Thank You Card Wording Examples:

{close family member}

Dear Uncle Jake and Aunt Judy,

Thank you for the gorgeous blanket you quilted for Michael and me. We will treasure it always. It means the world to us that you could make it to our wedding–we know it was a challenge. We look forward to see you soon and sharing the wedding pictures with you.

Much Love,
Sara and Michael

 

{friends, family and acquaintances}

Dear Sam,

Thank you for the bright red toaster you gave to Michael and me. We love it. It goes great in our new kitchen and we use it every day. Thanks so much for sharing in our big day. We were blessed to have you there!

Love,
Sara and Michael

Tips For Writing Your Thank Yous:

  • Use your guest list as a checklist
  • Keep record of WHO gave WHAT
  • Plan to write # a day {i.e. 10}
  • Use a high quality pen
  • Coordinate your Thank Yous with the rest of your wedding stationery
  • Order extras…

 

Enter to win 200 Thank Yous on Facebook:

Browse Thank You Cards.

 

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Truly Engaged: Adults-Only Wedding Wording

Categories Resources

I’m getting married! Now what? Truly Engaged is a new blog series written by Rachel, our *newly engaged* staff writer. As she wades her way through the wedding planning process, she’ll be sharing some of the emotions, inspiration, and insight she uncovers along the way

Kid at wedding

 

How do you tell guests that their kids are NOT invited to your wedding?

This no-kid conundrum seemed to be the stickiest wording situation Tim and I came across while making our wedding invitations. I read articles and browsed forums on adult-only weddings, each with their own tips for tackling this tricky subject. However, after reading them I realized something: We aren’t having an adults- only wedding. . . we’re having an “adults-mostly” wedding!

Our exceptions to the no-kids rule:

  • Children under 1 year (nursing infants)
  • All nieces/nephews/cousins (regardless of age)
For us, the exceptions were based on both chronological age and familial hierarchy (e.g., our siblings can bring children, but our cousins and friends cannot). The “kid cutoff” was a tough decision to make, but it was a decision grounded in both practical and personal reasons.

So how do you find the right wording for an “adults mostly” (but not adults-only) wedding?

This word puzzle was perplexing—even for a writer! We knew that we wanted the Invitation wording to be the following:

Courteous
We thought it might sound a little cold or exclusive to write “adults only” directly on the Invitation or RSVP Card (and besides, it wouldn’t apply to our “mostly adults” situation). We wanted to find wording that would be polite, inclusive, and friendly.

Clear
In addition to being courteous, we also wanted to be clear about who is invited (and therefore who is NOT invited). While some wording sounded too blunt, we also felt other wording sounded too subtle. Could we find the sweet spot for this sticky wording situation?

Flexible
To complicate matters, the wording also needed to be flexible in order to accommodate invitees whose children ARE invited to the wedding. We couldn’t use a blanket statement such as “adults only”. We needed to come up with wording that was flexible enough to fit our “adults-mostly” wedding.

 

Wording Ideas for an “Adults-Only” Wedding:

#1: Putting “Adults” on the RSVP Response Line

M_____________________

_____ Adults accepting
_____ Adults declining

 

#2: Putting” Adults” at the Bottom of the Invitation

Adult reception to follow

 

#3: Setting a Limit to Number of Seat Reservations

We have reserved _____ seats in your honor

___ of ___ Attending
___ of ___ Declining

 

Wording Solution for Our “Adults-Mostly” Wedding

Ultimately, our wording solution was this:

  • writing the names of invited guests on the outer envelope
  • emphasizing who was invited on the RSVP Card by writing their names under the subheading “Invited Guests”

RSVP Card for Invitation

 

Although not perfect, the wording satisfied our goal of sounding polite, yet clear–while still allowing for exceptions to the no-kids rule. So how successful was this? Well, we’re still figuring that out! :)

If any RSVP Cards come back with the names of uninvited children, my mom (moms are the best!) helped come up with a general plan of how to approach the guest:

  • Acknowledge their response
  • Address the miscommunication
  • Express desire for their attendance
Example:

Hi Jane,

Thank you for the RSVP! We noticed that you added little Jack to your response. In order to keep the seating capacity below the maximum for our venue, we unfortunately are not able to invite Jack to our wedding. We apologize for the miscommunication! We hope you will still be able to join us on our wedding day. We’d love to have you there!

 

Did you have an “adults-mostly” wedding? I’d love to hear how you handled the wording for your Invitations and RSVP Cards!

 

Rachel for MagnetStreet Weddings

 

 

 

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Stumped for Wedding Wording?

Categories Resources

 

Let’s hear them! Leave your wedding wording question{s} in the comments and we’ll help you with those wording dilemmas!

 

wedding

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Wedding Invitation Wording Ideas

Categories Resources

As you know, wording the wedding invitation no longer follows a linear path–it curves along life’s unique circumstances and family dynamics. And as you’re trying to get the etiquette part right, you’re also trying to infuse your wording with style and personality. Simply put, wording your wedding invitation takes time and consideration.

Be inspired by wording options below:

 

invitation wording ideas

 

Many couples are sharing the cost of the wedding with their parents.

When both sets of parents AND the bride and groom are hosting the wedding:

Along with their parents
Anna Evelyn Johnson
and
John Michael Smith
invite you to celebrate their wedding
on Saturday, the twenty-third of July
two thousand thirteen
at six o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Rochester, New York

 

Here are two examples for when the hosts are divorced and not remarried or divorced and remarried.

When the bride’s parents are divorced and {not remarried}:

Patricia Johnson
and
Robert Johnson
request the pleasure of your company
at the wedding celebration of their daughter
Anna Evelyn
to
John Michael Smith
Friday, twenty-third of July
two thousand thirteen
at six o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Rochester, New York

 

When the bride’s parents are divorced and mom {and stepfather} are hosting:

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Korman
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage
of Mrs. Korman’s daughter
Anna Johnson
to
John Smith
on Saturday, the seventh of July
two thousand thirteen
at four o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Brighton, New York

 

 

When both sets of parents are divorced and hosting:
The bride’s mother and groom’s parents are divorced {mom is remarried}.

Colleen Johnson
and
Mr. George Smith and Mrs. Janelle Smith Baker
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Anna Evelyn
to
John Michael
on Saturday, the seventh of July
two thousand thirteen
at six o’clock
Christ Lutheran
Brighton, New York

 

When the bride’s parents are hosting but you want to {include the groom’s family}: 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Korman
and
Mr. and Mrs. George Smith
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Anna Korman
to
John Smith
on Saturday, the seventh of July
two thousand thirteen
at four o’clock
Grace Fellowship Church
Brighton, New York

 

Many couples want to honor a deceased parent on their wedding invitation. Take care that the wording is such that it doesn’t look like the deceased person is hosting.
When you want to include a {deceased parent} parent on the invitation:

Mr. John Holmes
husband of the late Margaret Holmes
requests the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Anna Evelyn
to
John Michael Smith
Friday, the seventeenth of July
two thousand and thirteen
at six o’clock
Northbrook Church
Jackson, South Dakota

 

When the {bride’s father is deceased} and the groom’s parents are included on the invitation:

Anna Evelyn Johnson
daughter of
Colleen Johnson and the late Robert Johnson
and
John Michael Smith
son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Smith
request the pleasure of your company
at their marriage
Friday, the seventeenth of July
two thousand and thirteen
at six o’clock
Northbrook Church
Jackson, South Dakota

 

 

Do you have a special wording question?

Free Wedding Resources: View all our wedding invitation wording ideas at MagnetStreet Weddings.

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